Of Birds Flu, End times, Date setting and whether pigs have wings.

Official known for ’76 swine flu fiasco has died

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hVjIvyG9T03920fn_G_h_zIqtkaQ?docId=c36f9a21088a4e8c88bba138857f7d2f

He coordinated the CDC’s involvement in an international campaign to eradicate smallpox, a historically deadly scourge. The campaign was hugely successful — the last naturally occurring smallpox case was reported in the late 1970s. It also was one of the agency’s first major steps into international public health, a field in which the CDC is now considered a leader.

But for most people, Sencer is first remembered for his involvement in the 1976 swine flu vaccination campaign.

Health officials became alarmed when cases of a flu virus linked to swine were detected in soldiers at Fort Dix, N.J., including one young man who died. It reminded them of the terrible Spanish flu pandemic that caused millions of deaths around the world in 1918 and 1919.

Sencer coordinated a series of high-level meetings and recommended to President Gerald Ford that a national vaccination campaign be launched to prevent widespread deaths and illnesses.

More than 40 million Americans were vaccinated, but the epidemic never materialized. Worse, the government began to receive dozens of reports of a paralyzing condition called Guillain-Barre syndrome that was blamed on the vaccine. The campaign was suspended in December of that year and Sencer lost his job.

“He was the scapegoat,” said Dr. Howard Markel, a University of Michigan medical historian who knew Sencer.

But experts understand why he chose to be aggressive, and Sencer will be remembered fondly in the public health community, Markel added.

“I’d rather have somebody who over-reacted” than someone who didn’t do enough, he said.

Comment by Adamantine:

Scientists have predicted the arrival of the swine flu and now the bird flu incorrectly. They did not arrive. Thankfully.

Predicting the future is a difficult business.

The Bible has Christ telling His followers to be diligent in watching for His return. He also says they will never know the day or hour of His return. It is taught that they will know the season of His return.

The scientists of the world  five years ago felt we were in season when we were at a risk for a world wide pandemic for bird flu. They knew a season risk but they did not set a date. That was the wisdom of the response. Nevertheless they were wrong.

In 2007 many of us on these sites felt we were in the end times. We still do however we acknowledge that is some parts we were wrong.

Harold Camping was wrong in His date setting. That was foolish because as frail humans we should probably never set dates for predicting anything. It is essentially beyond our abilities. We are forced to recognize seasons however.

Harold camping was specifically wrong because despite a specific injunction by Christ not to predict a day and hour of His return Harold Camping did exactly that. May 21, 2011 at 6 pm.

What is sad about this for those of us who think we may be in the season of Christ’s return is Harold Camping is causing confusion and mockery at a time when real things may be happening. Hence we do not set dates but we are very concerned that MAYBE someday soon the foolishness of Harold Camping and the events of the real return of Jesus will overlap and many more will not see because of the sin of Harold. We do not know when that day or hour may arrive but Christ also tells us that even such mockery will be an additional sign of His return. Even the foolishness of men such as Harold Camping serves the wisdom of God.

“The time has come,” the Walrus said,
“To talk of many things:
Of shoes–and ships–and sealing-wax–
Of cabbages–and kings–
And why the sea is boiling hot–
And whether pigs have wings.” Lewis Carroll

In view of the teachings of the Bible I am sure someday the four Horsemen of the apocalypse will ride, a horrible pandemic illness will sweep the earth and  “pigs will have wings” 

All of the strange and difficult prophecies of the Bible will prove true.  Fortunately Christ Himself will also ride and arrive to set a troubled world back on its axis and rule a beautiful world with perfect wisdom.

I will not set a date but even good things sometimes arrive sooner than we expect.

The Walrus and The Carpenter

Lewis Carroll

(from Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, 1872)

The sun was shining on the sea,
Shining with all his might:
He did his very best to make
The billows smooth and bright–
And this was odd, because it was
The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,
Because she thought the sun
Had got no business to be there
After the day was done–
“It’s very rude of him,” she said,
“To come and spoil the fun!”

The sea was wet as wet could be,
The sands were dry as dry.
You could not see a cloud, because
No cloud was in the sky:
No birds were flying overhead–
There were no birds to fly.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Were walking close at hand;
They wept like anything to see
Such quantities of sand:
“If this were only cleared away,”
They said, “it would be grand!”

“If seven maids with seven mops
Swept it for half a year.
Do you suppose,” the Walrus said,
“That they could get it clear?”
“I doubt it,” said the Carpenter,
And shed a bitter tear.

“O Oysters, come and walk with us!”
The Walrus did beseech.
“A pleasant walk, a pleasant talk,
Along the briny beach:
We cannot do with more than four,
To give a hand to each.”

The eldest Oyster looked at him,
But never a word he said:
The eldest Oyster winked his eye,
And shook his heavy head–
Meaning to say he did not choose
To leave the oyster-bed.

But four young Oysters hurried up,
All eager for the treat:
Their coats were brushed, their faces washed,
Their shoes were clean and neat–
And this was odd, because, you know,
They hadn’t any feet.

Four other Oysters followed them,
And yet another four;
And thick and fast they came at last,
And more, and more, and more–
All hopping through the frothy waves,
And scrambling to the shore.

The Walrus and the Carpenter
Walked on a mile or so,
And then they rested on a rock
Conveniently low:
And all the little Oysters stood
And waited in a row.

“The time has come,” the Walrus said,
“To talk of many things:
Of shoes–and ships–and sealing-wax–
Of cabbages–and kings–
And why the sea is boiling hot–
And whether pigs have wings.”

“But wait a bit,” the Oysters cried,
“Before we have our chat;
For some of us are out of breath,
And all of us are fat!”
“No hurry!” said the Carpenter.
They thanked him much for that.

“A loaf of bread,” the Walrus said,
“Is what we chiefly need:
Pepper and vinegar besides
Are very good indeed–
Now if you’re ready, Oysters dear,
We can begin to feed.”

“But not on us!” the Oysters cried,
Turning a little blue.
“After such kindness, that would be
A dismal thing to do!”
“The night is fine,” the Walrus said.
“Do you admire the view?

“It was so kind of you to come!
And you are very nice!”
The Carpenter said nothing but
“Cut us another slice:
I wish you were not quite so deaf–
I’ve had to ask you twice!”

“It seems a shame,” the Walrus said,
“To play them such a trick,
After we’ve brought them out so far,
And made them trot so quick!”
The Carpenter said nothing but
“The butter’s spread too thick!”

“I weep for you,” the Walrus said:
“I deeply sympathize.”
With sobs and tears he sorted out
Those of the largest size,
Holding his pocket-handkerchief
Before his streaming eyes.

“O Oysters,” said the Carpenter,
“You’ve had a pleasant run!
Shall we be trotting home again?’
But answer came there none–
And this was scarcely odd, because
They’d eaten every one.


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